Ten health boosters

Published on the 29th May, 2011 by Azmina

  1. Lacking in concentration?  Try starting your day with a high bran cereal mixed with a handful of raisins.  The B vitamins are crucial for transmitting nerve signals.
  2. Trans fats are often found in processed foods like take-aways, cakes, pies and biscuits.  These act in your body just like saturated fats, which can raise your blood cholesterol and can clog your artery walls, making you more prone to heart problems.
  3. More than 70% of the salt you eat is added to your food by the manufacturer, often without you even knowing it. So worry less about salt you add at hoem and more about salt the food industry adds.
  4. Men – Watch that waist.  Men typically carry more fat around their belly.  Note that a waist measurement of more than 37 inches (and 36 inches for Asian men) increases your risk of heart disease.  If your waist measurement is as high as 40 inches, it really is time to take some serious massive action.
  5. Sweet potatoes are an excellent source of the anti oxidant beta-carotene, which the body can convert into vitamin A.  This vitamin is essential for healthy skin and night vision.
  6. The GiP diet encourages a variety of foods from all the food groups.  If followed, it should contain enough nutrients to meet your daily needs.  However, dieters often prefer to take a multivitamin and mineral supplement as well.  If you do so, ensure that you choose one that has no more than 100% recommended daily amount (RDA) of nutrients.
  7. The Inuit population has a high animal fat diet, yet they seem to be protected against heart disease.  Their fat comes primarily from cold water of fish, rich in omega-3 fatty acids.
  8. Suffer from fatigue?  This could be a sign of low iron levels.  Look at labels and select those foods that have been enriched with the iron, like breakfast cereals.  Red meat, dark poultry meat, dark green leafy vegetables and lentils, and dried apricots are all good iron providers.
  9. Kids behaving badly?  Choosing healthy slow-release carbs in meals and snacks for children can help to improve their concentration as well as sustain steady energy levels.
  10. Losing your marbles?  There is good research to show that as we get older, Omega 3 fats may play an important role in memory.